Mobility Scooters & Electric Wheelchairs at Scooters 'N Chairs

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Mobility Scooters

$1,929.00

Pride Victory 10 4-Wheel Scooter

$1,635.00

Golden Technologies: Buzzaround EX 4-Wheel Scooter

$2,000.00 $1,349.00

Pride Mobility: Go-Go Sport 4-Wheel

$2,199.00

Pride Mobility: Victory Sport 4-Wheel Scooter

$1,800.00 $1,249.00

Drive Medical: Scout DST 4-Wheel

$3,655.00 $2,999.00

Drive Medical: Panther HD

$1,649.00

Pride Victory 9 4-Wheel Scooter

$4,300.00 $4,165.00

Afikim: Afiscooter S 3-Wheel Scooter

$1,999.00

Golden Technologies: Companion II 4-Wheel Scooter

$1,999.00 $1,899.00

Drive Medical: Ventura Deluxe 4 Wheel Scooter

$1,899.00 $1,699.00

Drive Medical: Ventura 4 Wheel Scooter

Mobility Scooters

Our Mobility Scooters Collection

Mobility scooter is a broad and hugely varied term. They are called everything from disability scooters to handicap scooters to elderly scooters. Some people even refer to them as rascals!

Learn About Mobility Equipment & Their Uses

A mobility scooter is a kind of powered mobility aid on which the user is fully seated as it transports him/her. It helps people to get from one place to another with greater ease. In terms of its use, it broadly achieves the same result as a powered wheelchair, although it is configured differently.

This electric transport device is steered and controlled from a tiller (or steering column) in front of the user. Between the tiller and the user’s seat is a deck, or platform, where the user places his/her feet. 

As we discussed briefly above, you might find people referring to these assistive products with slightly varying names before the “scooter”, including handicap, senior, medical, disability, e.g. medical scooter. Those without tact sometimes refer to an “old people scooter.” Definitely, a better usage than the old school rascal name but this isn’t an entirely accurate name since young people use them too.

For the purposes of this article, we will use all these names interchangeably.

It’s important to note that some alternative terms don’t even specify that the vehicle is designed with medical mobility in mind. This can be pretty confusing, as many scooters are intended for recreational purposes or standard road travel.

For example, all the following terms are used to describe both recreational and medical scooters: power, motorized, adult, power-operated, and even just electric scooter!

We now have a problem, particularly when shopping online. If their names overlap, how can you tell whether you are looking at a motorscooter built to serve a similar purpose to a motorcycle, or a true mobility vehicle designed to aid the handicapped? 

Sure, the difference will be apparent in more extreme cases, like contrasting a travel handicap scooter to a full-fledged recreational motorscooter! However, occasionally the lines get close to one another, and it can be difficult to tell what is what.

Our advice to make sure you are purchasing a disability product that is intended for handicapped/elderly people is to look at the context. Does the store have a medical tone to it, or does it seem to be showcasing recreational activities? The best place to buy a motorized scooter is from a company or scooter store that specializes in medical supplies such as wheelchairs, senior scooters, and other assistive devices for the handicapped.

This way, not only will you know you’re in the right place, looking at suitable disability scooters for your condition, but you’ll also be getting the care and professional advice you need.

Purchasing a recreational scooter might not require knowledgeable staff and close attention to detail; however, purchasing a wheelchair scooter sure does! This is a device intended for people suffering from challenges in areas such as mobility, dexterity, and balance. Every effort must be made to ensure any suggested scooters for handicapped adults are absolutely safe for them in their unique condition. 

This is why we recommend going to a company that specializes in medical scooters – or, at the very least, in medicative appliances as a whole. These dealers will have an understanding of the products they sell from a mobility/disabled point of view, and will be able to provide you with the most safety-oriented and suitable suggestions for your needs.

Another good idea is to check what the reviews are saying for the chair you wish to buy. Are they mobility reviews? If not, look elsewhere for real sellers of scooters for disabled adults.

Do I Need a Power Scooter?

Now that we’ve discussed what the device actually is, we need to think about whether it could help you specifically in your life.

These questions may help you get a feel for how you might be losing out due to mobility limitations:

  • Do you find yourself not being able to get around like you once did? 
  • Are you disabled and unable to walk or stand for extended periods?
  • Do you refrain from going outdoors for fear of falling over, losing the strength in your legs, or losing your sense of balance?

An affirmative answer to any of these questions indicates that you could greatly benefit from getting a power mobility aid. You might want to know if a power wheelchair would be better for you rather than a scooter. If so, ask yourself the following questions. These will help you see if a scooter is your best pick of the available powered mobility devices, assuming you have decided to get one:

  • Will you be using your disability scooter outdoors or at home only?
  • Are the areas where you plan to use it well paved? Will you ever need to go over grass, gravel, or other uneven terrains?
  • Do you prefer a tiller control configuration to a joystick-based one?

These are a few pointer questions to help you find your way: power scooters are more suitable for the outdoors and rougher terrain, and wheelchairs are usually controlled by a joystick rather than a steering column. For a full explanation of the differences between different mobility vehicles and their advantages and disadvantages, click here.


Buying Handicap Scooters on a Limited Budget

What if you lack the financial means to buy a disability vehicle straight out? True, it might be worthwhile and sensible to buy and not go down the route of powered scooter rental, but that won’t help you if you lack the means!

In this case, there are two points to consider: First, prices have been drastically going down over the years. You now see U.S.-branded models starting at around $750 – considerably less than what many people believe an electric medical scooter actually costs.

Besides lower prices, there’s another even more attractive option available for those wishing to get motorized aid on a limited budget, which brings us to our next section.

Using Financing to Purchase Your Adult Scooter 

How about an option that allows you to buy and keep your scooter chair for about the same price as renting or even less? Sounds attractive? Enter financing programs.

High-quality vendors who specialize in handicap scooters will invariably offer you financing – the ability to spread out the scooter cost and pay for it in installments. These payment plans usually require you to pay a monthly sum, and that sum can be as low as $70 for a small electric scooter. 

Many plans for power chairs and scooters don’t even require you to make any down payment at all – you start off with a regular monthly payment soon after your purchase.

Depending on the total amount the product costs, it may take 12, 18, or more months to pay off, but remember: you’re paying monthly sums that are often lower than rental fees and for your money you get a scooter that is your very own. 

We at Scooters ‘N Chairs realize that even financing plans might prove to be a financial strain on some disabled people. To this end, we have a bi-annual scooter giveaway where we provide a 100% free mobility scooter to a lucky winner. You can apply to our giveaway directly from our site here.


Best Motorized Scooter For Adults

Our collection of electric scooters above shows products that have many things in common. They are all designed by U.S. manufacturers, constructed to very high standards, practical, and easy to use, and they all get high approval ratings from their users.


However, as mentioned at the beginning of this article, there is also a great deal that sets them apart. From aluminum frames to heavy steel, from bulky to super-compact, and from fairly slow speed limits to our fastest scooter, this collection is a mixed bunch.


Which is the disabled scooter? That will very much depend on the category you are interested in. For your convenience, we have collection pages for each general group, including travel, heavy-duty, and others. We have also selected at least one “best scooter’’ for each category. You can see them all here.


In this article, we have chosen two top-notch scooters in different categories that we believe are underrated and deserve special mentions.


Drive Medical: Ventura Deluxe 3 Wheel Power Scooter


The Ventura Deluxe isn’t usually touted as a Drive Medical “poster’’ scooter, but it deserves more attention than it actually gets. In the Ventura Deluxe, we find luxury meeting the standard handicapped scooter configuration, while retaining the easy-transport options of more travel-oriented models. 


If you want to go a step up from the compact scooters for sale out there, whether in comfort, performance, style, or size, the Ventura Deluxe is a perfect place to start.


Comfort is an obvious feature of the Ventura Deluxe, from the beautifully designed 18-inch-wide captain seat to the padded armrests, extra signal and hazard lighting, dual rear-view mirrors, and snazzy interchangeable panels that allow you some customization for a periodic color change.

 

There are also deluxe features that aren’t as obvious, such as full front and rear suspension under the metalwork to keep your ride pleasant and smooth. Since these are scooters for seniors, Drive Medical have designed the entire Ventura range to be easy to control and steer, with superior ergonomic controls throughout.


The Ventura Deluxe’s seat can swivel to allow for easy getting on and off. It gives you four height adjustments and can slide forward or backward like an automobile seat. This lets you customize the exact amount of room you need between the seat and the tiller so you can steer in what you find to be the most comfortable position.


If you prefer to sit back and have the steering tiller come to you, that’s easy as well. As a motor-driven vehicle, the Ventura has an easy-to-adjust Delta tiller that will come right up towards the seat, allowing you to control the scooter from a place of comfort.


With the Ventura’s armrests, your arms are taken care of when riding. The padded armrests not only look deluxe, but they act it too, with their super flexibility and adjustability in angle, height, and width.


A perfect indoor/outdoor balance is struck in the Ventura. On the one hand, you have heavy-duty features such as a 400-lb weight capacity, 16-mile scooter batteries, and flat-free 10-inch tires. With these advantages, you can go off-road and navigate gravel or poorly paved areas.


On the other hand, relative to full-sized heavy-duty scooters, the Ventura is compact in size, has the advantage of scooter mobility– easily disassembling into five pieces for storage or travel – and has a turning radius of only 53 inches, which is tight among outdoor four-wheeled power-operated scooters.


 

Pride Mobility: Go-Go Elite Plus Traveler 3 Wheel Scooter


The Go-Go Elite Plus Traveler 3 Wheel is a mouthful to say but it might well be worth your while! 


If you need a scooter for disabled persons that is super-well priced, is extra lightweight, and at the same time ticks the boxes for extra safety and performance, this often-overlooked scooter could be your answer.


At approximately $1,000, this is one of our cheaper scooters, but you still get a invalid scooter that has an 18 AH battery that lasts 12 miles on a single battery charge and three inches of ground clearance. You would usually see these kinds of features on heavier (and pricier) items, but with this model, Pride Mobility have made it their aim to pack many significant advantages into a compact value package.


Need to put the mobility scooter in your car trunk? Feather-touch disassembly is one of Pride Mobility’s most loved features, and the Go-Go hasn’t been left out. With a few simple moves, you have five manageable pieces that can be stored or packed in places a full-sized scooter could never go. The heaviest piece here is a cool 32 lbs – very feasible even for people who experience trouble when lifting weights.


With the Go-Go Elite Plus Traveler, you aren’t getting a skimpy mini scooter, either. It may not be the fastest outdoor scooter, but you’ll have a larger-than-average deck and chassis and a 300-lb weight allowance. If you’re taller or heavier than basic scooters allow for, you’re in the right place!


This scooter has allowed people who were previously excluded from travel scooters due to size or weight restrictions to enjoy the benefits of hassle-free travel.


The Go-Go Elite Plus Traveler does come in both three-wheel and four-wheel configurations, but if you need to turn on a dime with your medical scooter, the three-wheel model we’re talking about here is fantastic. With a 34-inch turning radius, you can easily navigate the mall and narrow passages, and get in and out of an annoyingly small elevator.


Additionally, you get versatile charging options that allow you to charge the mobility scooter batteries onboard or offboard. Just use the all-in-one dual voltage charger and pick which is more practical for you as you charge in different environments and circumstances. This can prove to be an enormous advantage, bearing in mind this is a scooter for handicapped people who don’t always have access to the places they need.


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